Everyday Learning Logic Puzzles
Featured , Logic , Math / February 5, 2013

Everyday Learning Logic Puzzles Content: Math – Logic Grade(s): 3rd – 7th Perspective: Secular Prep Time: None Teacher Manual: N/A Parent Involvement: Moderate Cost: $ || ? info Publisher: www.teacherspayteachers.com Updated Review: 04/17/2014 From Everyday Learning’s website: We’ve taken critical thinking activities to a whole new level by integrating content-area facts with fun, deductive thinking, table logic puzzles. Everyday Learning Logic packets come with a sample puzzle and step-by-step directions to help your kids learn how to do these kinds of brain teasers on their own. An answer sheet is in the back to help make your job a little easier. All of our logic puzzles have been kid-tested and edited for clarity and solve-ability. Find 5-puzzle packets for $3.00 each on the following topics: Halloween Thanksgiving Winter Holidays US Presidents Physical Geography Colonial History Be sure to check out ABC=123 Brainteasers, math-based logic puzzles called alphametics. These math puzzles appear deceptively easy at first glance, but can be very frustrating for students who have not been given some basic problem-solving skills to use. Alphametic problems require a great deal of mathematical reasoning to solve, which is why we’ve included an extra two puzzles in the packet with hints for…

Share

Language Mechanic
Grammar , Writing / February 7, 2011

Language Mechanic Content: Grammar Grade(s): 4th – 7th Perspective: Secular Prep Time: Minimal Teacher Manual: N/A Teacher Involvement: Minimal Cost: $ Pages: 172 Publication Date: 2001 Publisher: www.criticalthinking.com Date of Review: 11/13/2013 If you’ve got a quirky kid who likes logic, enjoys word humor, and picks language rules up quickly, then Language Mechanic may be a good grammar curriculum for your family. Each individual lesson begins with an attention “grabber” – a basic fact which is then followed by three sentences: You Write; Reader’s Think; and You Mean (to say). The sentences illustrate a specific grammar rule and demonstrate how it can be misused or misunderstood. A simple grayscale drawing accompanies the sentences to help draw out the humor. A logic box follows, explicitly stating the grammar rule and why it works. Students then complete the Practice items with an adult before attempting the Your Turn section. End-of-lesson Challenge questions can be saved for the next day to reinforce the grammar rule. All told, individual lessons should take no more than 15-20 minutes. Each chapter concludes with a Unit Review, which you can use as a quiz, if you like. These 1-2 page review sheets offer editing practice, as students…

Share