Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading

February 17, 2011
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Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading

Content: Phonics
Grade(s): K – 2nd
Perspective: Christian
Prep Time: Minimal
Teacher Manual: Yes
Teacher Involvement: Essential
Cost: $ || ?
Pages: 400
Publication Date: 2004
Publisher: www.welltrainedmind.com
Review Last Updated: May 27, 2017

Common Core Aligned: No

** From the Publisher’s Website: **

The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading cuts through the confusion, giving parents a simple, direct, scripted guide to teaching reading — from short vowels through supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading is user-friendly, affordable, and easy to follow — supplying you with everything you need to teach reading in one book.

Clarification: we do NOT offer a guarantee that children who learn phonics from The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading will win the spelling bee. We only guarantee that they will grow up to be avid readers with fantastic grades who get into elite universities, then proceed to change the world with their creativity, erudition, and passion, while respecting rich and poor alike, and calling their parents at least twice a week with genuine gratitude and in-depth updates.


About the Author:
Jesse Wise and Sara Buffington wrote The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading


Because one opinion is never enough! Have you ever used Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading? How did it work for your family? Share your review below.






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One Comment

  • Melissa October 15, 2015 at 4:26 pm

    I’ve used The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading for K/1st Grade and I like it because it is very straightforward. Once my students are reading well enough, I add Bob books and Pathway Readers for practice. I have a 1st grade daughter who completed OPGTR and is now a very confident reader so we don’t do any formal reading instruction now, just practice. The OPGTR is also not linked to a specific grade, so you just move at your child’s pace so if they are a struggling reader, they don’t have to feel behind by working in a below-grade-level book.

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